Inspections, Work Logs Imperative to Protect Condominium Associations Against Defective Concrete Restoration Projects

Posted On: May 9, 2013 , By Daniel Salas


Daniel Salas SRLDS.jpgConcrete restoration projects are unavoidable during the lifespan of every concrete building in South Florida. They are among the most expensive construction renovation projects that associations will be required to take on, and as such many associations and their property managers try to mitigate the costs as much as possible. However, the old adage that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure holds true with these projects. Associations should be very careful to avoid cutting corners on the record keeping, making sure to chronicle all of the work that was performed as part of these restoration projects in order to protect against the repercussions of shoddy work and defects.

My colleagues and I have experienced a number of instances where our association clients have had defects manifest themselves only a few years after a concrete restoration project has been completed. However, the associations have had a difficult time proving that the contractor was responsible due to inadequate and incomplete records of the work that was performed. After inspecting the defects in question, the contractors have responded by indicating that they were not responsible for the work on the affected areas. The associations then request records and work logs to verify the contractors' claims, only to find that the contractors and engineers did not keep detailed work logs of the work that was performed, leaving the association with little evidence to prove their claims.

balcony renovation.jpgThere are a number of measures that associations should take to avoid this scenario and protect themselves against the potential for inferior and defective work in concrete restoration projects. The foremost among these is the retaining of an independent third-party engineer or project manager to oversee and chronicle the restoration work performed in the building, and to help ensure that all of the work is performed in a cost-effective and timely manner. A third-party project manager not only protects the interest of the association during the construction process but also protects the association's interests should defects in the restoration work arise in the future. The benefits of hiring a third-party project manager are countless, for example, project managers will assist in the evaluation and hiring of the project engineer and contractor; evaluate the work of the engineer and contractor; hold timely meetings to review the process of the work performed; review the payment requisitions and daily logs; and keep the association informed of any potential issues on the project.

In addition to the use of an independent engineer or project manager, the association's attorney should also be called upon to review and or draft the contracts for the restoration project. The associations should ensure that their contracts include stipulations requiring that the general contractor and engineer maintain and provide to the association detailed work logs of all of the work performed. The standard warranty language in general construction contracts will not suffice without the detailed work logs showing exactly what work was performed and the location of such work in every facet of the building. It is much more difficult to hold contractors liable for defects in areas that are not documented as having been part of the restoration work performed.

Although these additional measures will add to the costs of concrete restoration projects for associations, without them the associations would be taking a significant risk of being unable to hold contractors responsible for any defects that may arise in the restored areas. Additionally, these added costs are minimal compared to the costs that the associations would endure in litigation or in repairs to the areas which had been restored. There is no doubt that concrete restoration projects are expensive, time consuming and a nuisance to the residents of the building. However, keeping these measures in place throughout the process will mitigate the time and money spent on the project as well as result in a well done concrete restoration project, retaining the value of the building as well as the safety of the residents.