Effective Collection Tactics for Associations Against Owners Who File for Bankruptcy

Thumbnail image for Jeffrey Berlowitz - Siegfried law firm.jpg Thumbnail image for Jonathan Mofsky Gort photo.jpgBy Jeffrey S. Berlowitz and Jonathan M. Mofsky.

Associations have been contending with unit owners who file for personal bankruptcy protection in greater numbers since the start of the economic crisis. In response to a unit owner bankruptcy, and in an effort to preserve and protect the rights of an association as a creditor in the bankruptcy proceeding, a number of effective tactics have emerged for associations and their attorneys when faced with a unit owner bankruptcy filing. This article provides an overview of certain of these strategic measures for condominium associations and homeowners associations.

Typically, unit owners file either a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition, both of which are personal bankruptcy filings. A Chapter 7 bankruptcy case is filed by an individual and involves the complete liquidation of a debtor’s non-exempt assets to pay creditors in exchange for a discharge of the debtor’s remaining debt, giving the debtor what is referred to as a “fresh start.” In Chapter 7, an individual can wipe out many types of unsecured debt and certain secured debt (in the event the debtor surrenders possession of the secured creditor’s collateral – typically real estate or an automobile). However, in the event the debtor elects to retain their real property or automobile, the secured obligation survives the bankruptcy and the debtor remains responsible for these secured obligations during and after the close of the bankruptcy case. This affects an association to the degree an owner elects to retain their unit. If such an election is made, then a Chapter 7 debtor remains obligated to pay the assessments that come due after the bankruptcy filing. Otherwise, if the owner surrenders the unit, then the owner will receive a full discharge of all monetary obligations to the association. As an aside, some debts, including alimony and child support obligations, taxes less than three years old, student loans and several others, are not dischargeable in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

To the extent there is a distribution to creditors in a Chapter 7 case, which is not the norm, the amount creditors will receive is determined by the value of the debtor’s non-exempt assets that are liquidated for the benefit of creditors.

With regard to real property, a unit owner who files for Chapter 7 bankruptcy is either retaining the unit and will agree to continue to pay the monthly assessments that become due after the bankruptcy case is filed, or alternatively, will surrender their unit as a result of the proceedings. In this context, associations should be cognizant of whether the owner is retaining or surrendering their unit. A retention of the unit most often results in the owner maintaining current with the assessments after the bankruptcy is filed. A surrender of the unit, which means the owner is relinquishing possession of the unit to his or her secured creditors (the first mortgage lender and/or the association), will result in the owner discharging all monetary obligations due the association as of the date of the bankruptcy filing. Additionally, at the successful conclusion of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case, the owner will receive a discharge of all sums due the association as of the date of the bankruptcy filing. However, as stated, if the owner elects to retain the unit, then the owner will remain liable for all assessments that come due after the bankruptcy case is filed.

Sometimes called a personal reorganization bankruptcy, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy does not require debtors to hand over any property to creditors. Instead, they must use their income to pay all or some of what is owed over a three to five year period, depending on the scope of the debt and income. Those who qualify for Chapter 13 must submit a detailed repayment plan that is subject to objections by creditors and must ultimately be approved by the court. Most owners who file for Chapter 13 are striving to keep their residence. Underwater house.jpg However, unit owners are now attempting to take advantage of a debtor friendly component of the bankruptcy laws affording a debtor the right to “strip off” all junior mortgages, lines of credit and association liens in the event the debtor proves to the court that the value of their unit is less than the amount due on their first mortgage. If successful, then the unit owner may receive the benefit of a complete avoidance of an association’s lien claim that existed as of the date of the bankruptcy filing. Discussed below, the association is not without a remedy and there are approaches to defending against a lien strip.

For owners in Chapter 13 bankruptcy who are trying to formulate a plan to repay some of their debt, the association has the right to review and object to the plan being considered by the bankruptcy court. However, bear in mind that judges tend to be fairly lenient in favor of debtors who make a good faith effort to confirm a repayment plan resulting in a restoration of their financial lives. In reviewing the owner’s proposed repayment plan, a primary concern of an association should be to verify that the amount that the debtor claims to the court that they owe to the association is correct and includes interest and attorneys’ fees. To best protect the association’s claim in the bankruptcy case, the association should file a “Proof of Claim,” which details to the penny exactly what the association is owed by the unit owner as of the bankruptcy filing date.

As mentioned, many Chapter 13 bankruptcy debtors attempt to utilize the lien stripping provisions of the bankruptcy code that enable them to have the bankruptcy court wipe away any second mortgages and association liens tied to the property if they are able to demonstrate that they owe more to their first mortgage lender than what their home is worth. If successful, then the owner will be able to avoid all sums due the association as of the bankruptcy filing date. However, note that in order to gain the benefit of the lien stripping laws, the owner must complete his or her bankruptcy plan and remit all payments due under the plan to the bankruptcy court. If the owner’s Chapter 13 case is dismissed for any reason or if the case is converted to a Chapter 7 liquidation (usually because the owner could no longer afford the Chapter 13 plan payments) then the association’s lien will be reinstated against the unit. Importantly, and as some consolation to the association, the owner remains liable to the association for all assessments that come due after the bankruptcy filing, even if a lien stripping action is in place. In other words, if the owner is maintaining the unit in either Chapter 7 or 13, the owner is liable for all assessments that accrue against the unit after the bankruptcy filing date.

As we have noted in previous articles and videos in this blog, we have assisted associations to avoid having their past-due assessments wiped away by Chapter 13 debtors using lien stripping. This is accomplished by countering the owner’s value of their home with an appraisal procured by the association which demonstrates that the current market value is actually greater than the amount due under the owner’s first mortgage.

In the rare case that the unit owner in Chapter 13 bankruptcy is current in the payment of their association fees and assessments at the time the bankruptcy case is filed, then the owner is authorized to make the assessment payments directly to the association outside of the structure of the bankruptcy repayment plan. Should the owner fall behind with these payments after the bankruptcy filing date, then the association can automatically commence collection/foreclosure actions directly against the owner without obtaining the bankruptcy court’s permission or otherwise going through the process of the bankruptcy proceedings.

Last, but not least, and of significant importance, once a bankruptcy case is commenced, under any chapter (7, 11 or 13), there is an “automatic stay” on all collection actions by any creditor, including the association. No creditor may continue to collect a pre-bankruptcy debt from a debtor, after the bankruptcy case is commenced, unless the court authorizes that creditor to do so. There are mechanisms and procedures to be followed in seeking “stay relief” from the court to resume collections, and these actions should be coordinated with a bankruptcy attorney who focuses on creditors’ rights.

Upon the issuance of a bankruptcy discharge in favor of a unit owner, which signifies the successful completion of the bankruptcy case, the stay on collections is lifted, but the association is no longer able to pursue personal liability against the unit owner for their debt which was owed as of the date of the bankruptcy filing. However, the association can and should pursue its lien rights by initiating a foreclosure action against the unit itself. This will help ensure that it will receive the maximum reimbursement from the foreclosing lender allowed under Florida law and from any potential third party who successfully bids on the unit at the foreclosure sale. The association should also send a letter to the owner acknowledging it is aware of the bankruptcy discharge and will act accordingly, including by exercising its rights to pursue a foreclosure action against the property itself as allowed under the law, and not seek monetary relief against the owner, personally.

Our attorneys who focus on bankruptcy matters and community association law work closely with associations that are contending with unit owners who file for bankruptcy. We write about important issues such as these for condominium associations and HOAs in this blog, and we encourage association members and directors as well as property managers to enter their email address in the subscription box at the top right of the blog in order to automatically receive all of our future articles.