Reviewing and Updating Associations’ Governing Documents and Bylaws

For condominium associations and HOAs, effective governing documents are essential for their successful management and financial wellbeing. Association boards should regularly review their governing documents and bylaws to ensure their continued functionality and eliminate provisions that may have become archaic.

Deciding whether the documents and bylaws need to be amended can be difficult, and ratifying new amendments with the approval of the membership often presents significant challenges. Most governing documents include voting requirements for amendments stipulating that they must be approved by super majorities of two-thirds or three-fourths of the membership.

One of the best approaches for associations to take in reviewing and updating of their governing documents is for the board of directors to appoint a revision committee for the documents. The committee, which should work together with the association attorney, should review all of the bylaws and develop suggested changes as necessary.

Some of the most common provisions of the association documents which may benefit from updates include those pertaining to voting, collections, leasing and fining procedures. Many associations are implementing amendments to limit voting rights to members who are not delinquent in their financial obligations to the association, and some are addressing recent statutory amendments authorizing electronic voting. Other associations are incorporating amendments to maximize their ability to recover attorney’s fees incurred for collection efforts, ban short-term rentals using websites such as Airbnb and other online listing services, strengthen their ability to fine members who refuse to comply with the community’s rules, and address rules involving pets and the use of the community’s amenities by members who are in arrears to the association.

Once the committee has identified changes to the bylaws that it would like to propose, they should present them to the board of directors. If the board approves, the committee should then work on drafting the amendments with the association’s legal counsel to ensure their enforceability and the likelihood of their adoption.

Before the proposed amendments are put to the membership for a vote, they should be presented and discussed with the members during the association’s monthly meetings or in special meetings that are called expressly for the purpose of proposing and considering the changes.

In order to facilitate the adoption of proposed amendments, they should be scheduled for votes at times during which higher voter turnout is expected, such as during the annual meeting. The text of the proposed amendments should be included in the delivery of notice for the meeting and its agenda, and the use of limited proxies should be considered for those who cannot attend the meeting in person.

While the process for changing a community association’s governing documents can be difficult and tedious, it is unwise for associations to ignore outdated provisions in their bylaws or avoid implementing important changes that can provide significant benefits.