New Embezzlement Case at S. Fla. Condo; Best Practices for Associations to Avoid Theft

If it seems as if there have been more and more stories in the news recently about condominium association’s funds being stolen or misappropriated by either board members or property managers, it’s because it’s true. Many of the reports have been coming from Bob Norman of Local 10 News (WPLG), the ABC affiliate for Miami-Dade, Broward and the Keys.

Norman’s latest story aired on Aug. 28, and it can be watched below. The story discusses the arrest of the former property manager of The Waterway condominium in Hollywood, Fla., for the alleged embezzlement of $228,000 from the association.

The information uncovered by Norman for this report is similar to that of many other cases that he and other Florida journalists have chronicled over the last several years which appear to be a disturbing trend in condominium and homeowner associations. Board members should pay close attention to the business of the association in order to avoid becoming the next victim of an unscrupulous manager or director. As we have discussed in the past, a board member’s responsibility is not limited to simply showing up at meetings to vote. Recall that board members are charged with a fiduciary responsibility to protect the interests of the entire association and all of its members. This means being vigilant about the business of the association.

The association in this case broke one of the cardinal rules of association management by allowing the property manager to sign checks on its behalf. Board members should be the only individuals allowed to sign checks, and I typically recommend that at least two board member signatures be required. Looking at the supporting documentation, backup and invoices for those checks is also important.

In addition, associations should be diligent when hiring new managers including performing background checks and checking references. While individuals who have been convicted of a felony (whose residency rights have not been restored) cannot serve as directors, some associations even go so far as to run background searches on candidates or seated board members.

Associations should also request duplicate statements from their banks, and the statements should be sent to someone other than the person who is handling the bookkeeping. In addition, association accounts should be independently and professionally audited at least once per year.

By taking these and other precautions, associations can help to avoid becoming the victim of fraud, theft and embezzlement.