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Articles Posted in Collections

Foreclosures by community associations against their delinquent unit owners were virtually unheard of 10 years ago, as lenders would almost always move quickly with their own foreclosures against these owners, and their first-mortgage liens are superior to those of associations. Today, the practice has become the prudent approach for cases involving lenders that try to place their mortgage foreclosures into a holding pattern while they wait for the housing market to make a complete recovery.

Questions regarding compliance with the federal Fair Debt Collections Practices Act for the collection of community association assessments by property management companies have been a source of confusion in the industry for decades. Since the ruling in Harris v. Liberty Community Management, Inc., property management companies that fall within the exemption found in §1692a(6)(F)(i) of the FDCPA are not subject to the restrictions imposed by the Act.

LauraManningHudson.jpgFirm partner Laura M. Manning-Hudson wrote an article that appeared in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s only business daily and official court newspaper, about the recent spate of decisions by the Second, Fourth and Fifth District Courts of Appeal with regard to whether the court in a mortgage foreclosure action retains jurisdiction to determine the amount of unpaid condominium and homeowners association assessments that a foreclosing lender must pay. Her article reads:

LauraManningHudson.jpgFirm partner Laura M. Manning-Hudson wrote an article that appeared in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s only business daily and official court newspaper, about the recent decision by the Fifth District Court of Appeal in the case of Central Park A Metrowest Condominium Association v. Amtrust REO I. Her article reads:

JeffreyBerlowitz.jpgFirm partner Jeffrey S. Berlowitz wrote an article that appeared in today’s edition of the Miami Herald’s “Business Monday” about the recent decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Bank of America v. Caulkett. His article calls for changes to the bankruptcy code to eliminate lien stripping for community associations. It reads:

JeffreyBerlowitz.jpgThe firm’s Jeffrey S. Berlowitz, who has focused much of his work on helping community associations to contend with unit owners who attempt to wipe away association liens by filing for bankruptcy, was quoted extensively in an article in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review on the implications of the recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Bank of America v. Caulkett. The court ruled that homeowners who are underwater on their first mortgage cannot void second mortgages by filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and the ruling also appears to apply to other secured lienholders including community associations.

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The firm’s Lindsey Thurswell Lehr wrote an article that appeared in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s only business daily and official court newspaper, about the implications of the recent decision by the Fourth District Court of Appeal in the case of Pudlit 2 Joint Venture v. Westwood Gardens HOA. Her article reads:

As if collections of delinquent accounts were not already difficult enough for condominium associations and HOAs in Florida as the state recovers from the foreclosure crisis, a recent ruling by the Second District Court of Appeal has unfortunately created a new wrinkle that will require community association managers, directors and their legal counsel to pay close attention when accepting partial payment of assessments from owners. The court’s ruling in the case of St. Croix Lane Trust v. St. Croix at Pelican Marsh Condominium Association essentially now makes it a necessity for associations to consult with experienced legal counsel when they receive checks that are in any way endorsed as representing the full and final payment of assessments owed by the owner on whose behalf the payment is made.

Would you be surprised to learn that an owner could walk away from his home, stop making mortgage payments, avoid all personal liability for debt on the property and still make nearly $100,000 after the property is foreclosed upon by a mortgage lender? Well, it can happen.