Articles Posted in Condominium Terminations

Senate Bill 1520 was signed by Governor Rick Scott on June 16, 2017. The following is a summary of the bill, which will take effect on July 1, 2017:

SB 1520 amends 718.117, Florida Statutes, regarding the optional termination of condominiums, making it more difficult for a Plan of Termination to be passed without full consent of the unit owners.  The changes to the law reduce the amount of unit owners required to reject a plan, postpone the time until another plan can be voted on, and requires that the plan be approved by the Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares, and Mobile Homes of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (“Division”) based on factual and public policy reasons. Further, it guarantees that an optional termination will not result in a unit owner receiving less than his or her purchase price of the unit.

Changes to 718.117(1), (3) and addition of (21):

Applicability

  • The statute contains language indicating it is controlling over language in a condominium’s declaration and applies to all condominiums in the state in existence on or after July 1, 2007. The phrase: “Unless the declaration provides for a lower percentage” has been stricken indicating that the threshold established in the statute is the minimum vote required for optional termination.

Optional Termination

  • Prior to the effective date of the amendment, in order to approve a plan of termination, 80% of unit owners must approve the plan, and no more than 10% of unit owners can object. The changes to the statute now require an 80% unit owner vote approving a plan of termination; with less than 5% objecting. Additionally, the changes to the statute now provide that once the plan of termination passes a unit owner vote, it would then need to be approved by the Division.
  • The Division will have 45 days to review the Plan of Termination and notify the association of any deficiencies, or if it is rejected. If the Division does not respond within 45 days, the plan is deemed accepted.  Under the new law, plans of termination will now need to include factual circumstances that show that the plan complies with Section 718.117, Florida Statutes, and supports the public policies of the section, which are listed below.
  • If a plan of termination is rejected by 5% or more of the total voting interests of the condominium, then a new plan may not be considered for 24 months, as opposed to the current period of 18 months.
  • Under the current law, a condominium owner who purchased a unit from the developer must be made “whole” upon termination. In other words, the plan of termination could not provide for paying the unit owner less than the original purchase price. SB 1520 removes the language that restricts this requirement only to the original unit owner, meaning that an owner who purchased a resale condominium would also be entitled to receive a minimum of the purchase price upon optional termination. The bill applies this section to all unit owners, not just the ones who object to the plan.

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LindseyTLehr-thumb-200x300-94705Helio De La Torre 2013The firm’s Helio De La Torre and Lindsey Thurswell Lehr were interviewed during the last few days by reporters from the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s exclusive business daily and official court newspaper, and The Real Deal, one of South Florida’s leading sources for real estate news and analysis.  They were asked by the journalists for their insights into the ramifications of a decision last week by the Third District Court of Appeal that has significant implications for the future of condominium terminations in Florida.

The case pitted the Tropicana Condominium Association against the developer of the neighboring Ritz-Carlton Residences in Sunny Isles Beach.  The appellate court ruled in favor of the developer, which had ties with a group of five unit owners at the Tropicana, finding that the property’s bylaws required unanimous approval for a sale, despite the 80 percent threshold in the amended condominium termination legislation from 2007.  It agreed that the five holdouts’ refusal to sell was enough to block the termination that was favored by the association because the property’s 1983 governing documents predate the legislative amendment and require all unit owners to approve termination.

The Third DCA ruled that the 2007 changes to the Florida statute don’t apply retroactively to condominium declarations from prior to 2007 unless they contain certain language that incorporates amendments to the state’s Condominium Act.

The appellate court said in its ruling that “when referencing Florida’s Condominium Act, the declaration [for Tropicana] did not contain the words ‘as amended from time to time.’ Absent this language in the declaration, changes by the legislature to the Condominium Act subsequent to the effective date of the declaration do not become part of the declaration automatically.”

TRDlogoAs Helio explains in the article from The Real Deal that appeared on Nov. 18:

“The statute seemingly had language that suggested the intent was to make it retroactive,” said law firm partner Helio De La Torre, who has represented condo associations in similar cases centering on termination of associations through votes by unit owners. He is a partner of Coral Gables-based Siegfried, Rivera, Hyman, Lerner, De La Torre, Mars & Sobel, P.A.

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