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Articles Posted in Meetings and Elections

Community association attorneys are often asked about the lack of uniformity in the Florida laws and regulations for condominium associations and those for homeowners associations. There are many differences between the statutes governing condominium associations and those for HOAs, and condominiums are much more heavily regulated.

The year-end holiday season is also the season in which most community associations celebrate their annual meetings and elections. But no matter when your community association celebrates its annual meeting and election, it is important to begin the planning and organizing process well in advance in order to help ensure the best possible outcome.

For the second consecutive day, an article on important issues for community associations authored by one of our firm’s partners appeared today as a guest column in the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s only business daily and official court newspaper. Partner Michael E. Chapnick with our West Palm Beach office wrote the article in today’s edition of the newspaper about the new electronic voting law for community associations. His article calls for the state’s Division of Condominiums to establish an approval and certification process for the e-voting systems providers. It reads:

As the season for annual meetings and elections at South Florida community associations comes to a close, our firm’s other community association attorneys and I are reminded of the significance of following all of the necessary protocols to ensure that association meetings and elections run as smoothly as possible. This topic further serves as a priority to many of our community association clients, causing many of them to inquire about safeguarding their election procedures and other issues such as perceived discrepancies between statutory election guidelines and the related provisions of their associations’ governing documents.

GaryMars.jpgThe following article authored by the firm’s Gary M. Mars appeared in the April issues of Our City Weston and Our City Davie magazines:

Yet another report about an ongoing dispute involving alleged board member malfeasance at a Broward County condominium association has made the local nightly newscast on Local 10 News (WPLG, ABC). The report by the station’s Bob Norman chronicles the concerns of a number of the residents at the Summer Lake Condominium in Oakland Park over the actions of their association’s board of directors, which has been fined by the state’s Division of Condominiums for failing to hold timely elections.

With the new year comes new plans, new resolutions and . . . elections. For many community associations election season is well under way and, as easy as an election may seem (go out, get the votes, and count the ballots – right?), there are so many statutory nuances in the electoral process that, if handled improperly, can invalidate the entire election and cost the association both time and money. In an effort to assist association boards and hopefully avoid costly mistakes during the process, we have outlined the pertinent information that you need to know.

Nicole Kurtz, one of our firm’s other community association attorneys in our Miami office, wrote in this blog in September about a fight caught on video at a Sunrise HOA board meeting that was aired by WPLG Local 10 on the station’s nightly newscast. Well, it did not take long for the station to air another story featuring a brawl as well as nasty arguments videotaped at another local HOA community.

An arbitration decision rendered earlier this year by the State of Florida Division of Condominiums involving a dispute over alterations approved by a condominium board without a prior meeting and vote of the unit owners did not surprise our firm’s community association attorneys. We often find ourselves reminding association directors and property managers that the changes they are considering – albeit seemingly minor in nature – could be among those changes that are considered “material alterations” requiring approval by the membership.

Our firm’s other community association attorneys and I have witnessed, or heard about, scores of heated exchanges between disgruntled unit owners and board members at community association board of directors’ meetings. However, a video that aired on WPLG Local 10 nightly news last week involving the physical attack of a unit owner by the then-president of the condominium association governing the Waterbridge Condominiums in Sunrise left many of us shocked.