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Articles Posted in New Legislation

Gary-Mars-2021-2-200x300When the editors of the Miami Herald decided they would like to feature a new column to provide timely legal knowledge on real estate topics for the readers of its Neighbors community news section that appears on Sundays, they turned to the attorneys of Siegfried Rivera as the exclusive contributors for the newspaper’s new Real Estate Counselor.  The inaugural edition of the new monthly column authored by the firm’s Gary M. Mars appears in today’s edition and as is titled “All Eyes on Florida Legislature for High-Rise Condo Safety Reforms.”  It focuses on the status of reforms after the horrific tragedy of the Champlain Towers South collapse.  Gary’s article reads:

. . . So far, the most significant changes have come at the federal level from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, two government-sponsored companies that acquire residential loans to offer mortgage-backed securities for investors in the secondary market. They both have a massive influence over the terms for mortgages offered by lenders, and they recently released new requirements for loans for residences in high-rise buildings with five or more attached units to meet their standards for acquisition. The changes, which are now being adopted and implemented by major residential lenders, place a heavy focus on structural and financial stability, and they reinforce the importance of meticulous documentation of all appraisals, meeting minutes, financial statements, engineering reports, inspection reports and reserve studies.

Miami-Herald-1-23-22-1006x1024Fannie’s new requirements are already in effect, while Freddie’s will take effect for all mortgages with settlement dates on or after Feb. 28. Its new standards will exclude from eligibility any condo loans for units in communities with what it considers to be critical repair needs, which are defined as those that significantly impact a community’s safety, soundness, structural integrity or habitability, and/or that impact unit values, financial viability or marketability. These include all life-safety hazards, violations of any laws or ordinances, building code violations, fire-safety deficiencies and others.

Subsequently, properties that have already identified elements requiring attention and begun their remediation efforts may become ineligible until such work is completed.

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Florida’s condominium laws were amended earlier this year to require that new association bylaws provide for alternative dispute resolution including mediation and arbitration, for many types of disputes. Prior to these latest changes to the state’s laws, condominium associations and unit owners were required to arbitrate these same types of cases with the Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares, and Mobile Homes prior to going to court.

Arbitrations under the state agency were a prerequisite to filing suit for condo association/owner disputes that involved or required owners to take any action, or not take any action involving their unit, or to alter or add to a common area. Arbitration was also required for actions involving elections, meeting notices and meeting conduct, requests to inspect records, and condominium terminations.

florida_dbpr-300x170Instead, the changes now allow condominium associations or unit owners to choose between the state agency’s hearing process or the pre-suit mediation process as required under the state’s HOA laws. All disputes involving elections and recalls must still go to the Division first.

What is the best choice for condominium associations: the arbitration process with the state agency that has been hearing such disputes for many years, or the pre-suit mediation process?

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Eduardo-Valdes-srhl-lawAn article authored by firm partner Eduardo J. Valdes is featured in the op-ed “Opinions” page of today’s South Florida Sun Sentinel.  The article, which is titled “Post-Surfside, condo associations must be proactive with change | Opinion,” focuses on the impact that the horrific tragedy of the Champlain Towers South collapse has had on the condominium associations for similar towers nationwide and their boards of directors.  Eduardo notes that in addition to the shared grief and remorse with the families and friends of all the victims, many condo owners across the country are now raising questions about their own buildings’ structural safety and financial health, and some have also begun to feel more concerned about the funding of reserve accounts for major repairs and replacement projects.  His article reads:

 . . . All buildings deteriorate over time, so associations should always set aside funding on an ongoing basis to mitigate and remediate any structural elements that require attention.

As they begin reassessing their associations’ commitments, condominium boards of directors will generally try to avoid special assessments demanding additional funds from all the unit owners. They will need to consult with legal, financial, engineering and insurance professionals to strike a balance between the funding of reserves and the use of special assessments when they become necessary from a life-safety standpoint.

Sun_Sentinel_Logo-300x97Condominium association directors and unit-owner members would also be well advised to come to terms with the new reality that future buyers will now have many more questions and concerns than in the past about the financial health of the association and current state of the actual property from the ground up. Some will surely request that sellers provide them with the minutes from prior board meetings, information on any past or planned special assessments, the status of renovation and remediation projects, past changes to the monthly assessments over the years, the findings of past reserve studies, and the status of current reserve funding. They are also now more likely to conduct a thorough visual inspection of the entire property prior to making a written offer.

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Several bills that will impact community associations throughout the state were enacted into law this year. The following are summaries of community association-related bills that the Governor approved:

Senate Bill 72: Civil Liability for Damages Relating to COVID-19

Florida-legislature2-300x169The Florida Legislature made Covid-19 civil liability protections for businesses, healthcare providers, non-profits, and other organizations a major priority for the 2021 session, and on March 29th it became the year’s first bill signed into law by Gov. Ron DeSantis. With the enactment of Senate Bill 72, creating Section 768.38, Florida Statutes, businesses are now afforded protection from civil liability claims stemming from the Covid-19 virus as long as the business made a good faith effort to substantially comply with government-issued health standards or guidance at the time the cause of action would have accrued.

Individuals seeking to file claims for coronavirus-related injuries or death against covered entities will need to provide an affidavit from a medical professional asserting that they contracted the virus at the corresponding property. The claims must also demonstrate “clear and convincing evidence” of “gross negligence” in order to establish its validity. In order to prevail, plaintiffs will also be required to demonstrate in court that a defendant did not make a good faith effort to comply with public health guidelines.

The law also sets a one-year statute of limitations for the filing of lawsuits from either the date of death, hospitalization or the Covid-19 diagnosis involved in the claim, whichever is latest. The new law applies to claims that accrued before the enactment of the law and within one year following the Governor’s March 29 signing, but it does not apply to lawsuits that have already been filed.

Senate Bill 630: Community Associations

Section 627.714, Fla. Stat., has been revised to provide that if a condominium association’s insurance policy does not provide rights for subrogation against the unit owners in the association, an insurance policy issued to an individual unit owner in the association may not provide rights of subrogation against the condominium association.

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This year’s legislative session proved to be a busy one, with a number of bills passed by the Florida Legislature that will impact community associations throughout the state. We recently covered the passing of Senate Bill 72 in our blog, also known as the Civil Liability for Damages Relating to COVID-19, which you can access by clicking here. The following are summaries of additional bills that have passed the Legislature and are pending action by the Governor:

Senate Bill 630: Community Associations

Senate Bill 630 represents sweeping changes for Florida communities. These changes include allowing condominium associations to use the demand for pre-suit mediation process; increases the amount that can be charged for a transfer fee from $100 to $150; addresses insurance subrogation by clarifying that if a condominium insurance policy does not provide rights for subrogation against the unit owners in the association, an insurance policy issued to an individual unit owner in the association may not provide rights of subrogation against the association; and clarifies that associations’ emergency powers extend to health emergencies and includes holding virtual meetings and implementing plans based on advice from health officials. The legislation also prohibits associations from requiring certain actions relating to the inspection of records; revises requirements relating to the posting of digital copies of certain documents by certain condominium associations; authorizes condominium associations and cooperatives to extinguish discriminatory restrictions; revises the calculation used in determining a board member’s term limit; and deletes a prohibition against employing or contracting with certain service providers. The bill also makes important limitations to homeowners’ association rental restrictions adopted after July 1, 2021 and provides that any governing document or amendment to a governing document enacted after July 1, 2021, in connection with certain rental restrictions will apply only to parcel owners who acquire the property after the effective date of the governing document or amendment, or to parcel owners who consent to the governing documents or amendment. The bill also brought changes to condominium association websites, allowing them to make their official records available on mobile apps and now allowing both condominiums and homeowners associations to adopt rules for posting notices on websites and mobile apps, provided that electronic notices are still emailed to members who have consented to receive electronic notices. The bill also requires that notices of intent to record a claim of lien specify certain dates. It authorizes parties to initiate pre-suit mediation under certain circumstances; specifies the circumstances under which arbitration is binding; revises requirements for certain fines; revises provisions relating to a quorum and voting rights for board members remotely participating in meetings; revises the procedure to challenge a board member recall; revises the documents that constitute the official records of an association; revises the types of records that are not accessible to members or parcel owners; revises the circumstances under which an association is deemed to have provided for reserve accounts; and authorizes certain developers to include reserves in the budget. This act shall take effect July 1, 2021.

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Senate Bill 630, a bill that has wide support from community association industry interests across the state, passed the Florida Senate with a unanimous vote of 40 to zero. It will now move to the Florida House of Representatives for consideration.

The bill represents sweeping changes for Florida communities. It allows condominium associations to use the same non-binding arbitration process used by HOAs; increases the amount that can be charged for a transfer fee from $100 to $150; addresses insurance subrogation; and clarifies that associations’ emergency powers extend to health emergencies.

The legislation also prohibits associations from requiring certain actions relating to the inspection of records; revises requirements relating to the posting of digital copies of certain documents by certain condominium associations; authorizes condominium associations and cooperatives to extinguish discriminatory restrictions; revises the calculation used in determining a board member’s term limit; and deletes a prohibition against employing or contracting with certain service providers.

Flalegislature-300x169The bill also features several changes pertaining to electric vehicle and natural gas charging/filling stations, including: revising the requirements for electric vehicle charging stations; providing requirements for natural gas fuel stations; authorizing boards to take certain actions relating to electric vehicle charging stations and natural gas fuel stations; providing that the installation, repair, or maintenance of electric vehicle charging stations or natural gas fuel stations do not constitute material alterations or substantial additions to the common elements or association property; and providing that labor and materials associated with the installation of a natural gas fuel station may not serve as the basis for filing a lien against an association but may serve as the basis for filing a lien against a unit owner.

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The Florida Legislature made Covid-19 civil liability protections for businesses, healthcare providers, non-profits, and other organizations a major priority for the 2021 session, and on Monday, March 29, it became the year’s first bill signed into law by Gov. Ron DeSantis. SB 72, the bill that provides several Covid-related liability protections for businesses, healthcare providers, educational institutions, government entities, religious institutions, and not-for-profit corporations such as community associations, is now the law in Florida.

Under the new law, covered entities will be shielded from civil liability for Covid-related lawsuits for monetary damages, injuries or deaths so long as the allegations do not involve gross negligence or intentional misconduct.

Flalegislature-300x169As of March 29, Florida community associations that have implemented measures to safeguard their residents and staff from the potential spread of Covid-19 in their communities and comply with local, state and federal guidelines are protected from liability for Covid-related lawsuits.

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There are several bills being debated by state lawmakers in the current legislative session that will impact Florida community associations. The most significant proposed legislation for associations is also one of the most important for many of the state’s businesses.

HB 7, which creates COVID-19 liability protections for Florida businesses and nonprofit organizations, including community associations, has cleared its first committee stop with an 11 to 6 vote. Its advocates contend the measure is a necessary component to Florida’s economic recovery. Flalegislature-300x169The Florida House Speaker has vowed to make the bill a priority. Its next stop is the House Health and Human Services Committee.

One of the other measures that community association industry watchers are tracking is HB 21. House Bill 21 revises the requirements for construction defect causes of action relating to certain violations, and revises provisions relating to the requirements for notices of claim, property inspections, and service of copies of notices.

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Community associations in Florida contending with fraudulent emotional support animal (ESA) requests may get some relief. Governor DeSantis signed SB 1084 into law on June 23, 2020.  The new law prohibits discrimination from housing providers to someone requiring an ESA, but also prohibits health care practitioners from providing information regarding a person’s need for an emotional support animal without having personal knowledge of the person’s need for the animal.

The law, which becomes effective on July 1, 2020, requires a patient to establish the need for an ESA by delivering to the housing provider supporting information from a licensed healthcare practitioner, a telehealth provider, or other similarly licensed practitioner, including an out-of-state practitioner who has provided in-person care or services to the patient on at least one occasion.  esupdog-300x234It is important to keep in mind that the in-person requirement is only for establishing the disability, not for establishing the need for an animal.  Housing providers may establish a routine method for receiving and processing ESA requests. However, they cannot require the use of any specific forms, deny a request solely because the resident did not follow their methods, or request information that discloses the diagnosis or severity of the resident’s disability.

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While the 2020 Florida Legislative session was positioned to be a very active one, the COVID-19 pandemic seems to have affected the number of bills passed by the legislature. Below we have provided brief summaries of the bills passed by the Florida Legislature which impact Florida community associations.  It is important to note that at this time only a couple of the adopted bills have been signed by the Governor.

ADOPTED BILLS

SB 476: Law Enforcement Vehicles.  The approved bill includes provisions which preclude a condominium, cooperative, and homeowners’ associations, respectively, from prohibiting a law enforcement officer from parking his or her assigned law enforcement vehicle in certain areas.  The effective date of this bill is 2/21/2020.

SB 140: Fireworks.  The approved bill relates to the use of fireworks and defines the term “designated holiday”.  The bill provides for an exemption for the use of fireworks solely and exclusively during a designated holiday and prohibits homeowners’ associations from promulgating certain rules or regulations restricting same.  The effective date of this bill is 4/8/2020.

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