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Articles Posted in Renovation Projects

Daniel Salas SRLDS.jpgConcrete restoration projects are unavoidable during the lifespan of every concrete building in South Florida. They are among the most expensive construction renovation projects that associations will be required to take on, and as such many associations and their property managers try to mitigate the costs as much as possible. However, the old adage that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure holds true with these projects. Associations should be very careful to avoid cutting corners on the record keeping, making sure to chronicle all of the work that was performed as part of these restoration projects in order to protect against the repercussions of shoddy work and defects.

Many individuals or associations have been victimized by unscrupulous contractors. These experiences include defective work resulting in costly disputes with contractors and efforts to correct deficiencies; contractors abandoning jobs; and the filing of liens on the owners’ property, despite payment for such services or goods having been made to the contractor. A basic understanding of construction lien laws may minimize exposure to the problems described above. Chapter 713, Florida Statutes (the “Construction Lien Laws”), provides protection to owners engaging contractors to perform work on their property, and it protects contractors, their subcontractors, suppliers and other professionals to ensure that they are paid for their services.

Has this ever happened at your condominium? You’re on the Board of Directors. The building has not been painted in 20 years and could definitely use some restoration. You realize that a special assessment is going to have to be passed in order to start a painting and restoration project, but before an assessment can be passed, you need to know how much it’s going to cost. Bids for a painting and restoration contractor are requested, and ultimately High & Dry Painting Company (“High & Dry”) is hired to do the work. Without having an attorney look anything over, the association signs a contract with High & Dry and the project is underway. High & Dry arrives at the building along with a crew and equipment, and the company finishes the job in a month. The association writes a check for the full amount of the contract and everybody is happy. Or so you thought.