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Articles Tagged with association drone rules

Drones have become extremely popular for those who yearn for the latest gadgets and gizmos.  Many associations have already adopted rules to address the use of drones in their communities, and those that have not done so should give it serious thought and consideration.

When equipped with cameras, drones can be used to violate the privacy of association residents, not to mention their ability to cause major property damage, so associations should take a proactive approach toward developing and implementing rules and restrictions to protect the interests of those residing within their community.  Specifically, some examples of the rules and policies that associations are implementing include:

d2-300x176Restricting the space within which drones may be flown, such as over their operator’s personal lot, or those lots of adjoining neighbors (with their prior permission).

Limiting drone use to association common areas that are away from roads, buildings, playgrounds and other amenities.

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The growing use of drones by consumers across the U.S. is leading to the adoption of new rules and restrictions by the federal government, state governments and community associations.  Questions regarding safety, property damage and privacy abound with drones, and associations are responding by establishing clear parameters for their use by unit owners.

Last year, the Federal Aviation Administration enacted new regulations for the use of unmanned aircraft systems, which are more commonly referred to as drones.  For recreational users, the FAA now requires that drones must be properly registered and labeled with the registration number.  They must only be flown below 400 feet and always within sight of the operator, and they are banned from use near other aircraft and airports as well as over groups of people, stadiums, sporting events, or emergency response efforts.

Privacy concerns over the use of drones with cameras were addressed by a new Florida law that was enacted last year.  The law stipulates that drones with cameras may not be used to record images of privately owned properties or of the owners, tenants or occupants of properties in violation of their reasonable expectations of privacy without their written consent. drne-300x200 Reasonable expectations of privacy are presumed if individuals are not observable by others located at ground level in a place where they have a legal right to be, regardless of whether they are observable from the air with the use of a drone.

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