NOTE: Our Client Portal is Currently Undergoing Maintenance

Subscribe by Email

Articles Tagged with community association disputes

When disagreements and disputes arise amongst those who serve on community association boards of directors, emotions can run high in light of the impactful nature of the decisions made by such directors.  However, as association directors are duty bound to act in the best interests of their community and its owners, they should seek to avoid engaging in personal spats and attacks with one another and the owners that could lead to potential legal liabilities for the association.

One of the best examples of the dangers of public rows between association directors and unit owners is now playing out at the Porta Bella Yacht and Tennis Club in Boca Raton (pictured below).  As chronicled in a recent report from www.BocaNewsNow.com, homeowner Samuel Loff filed a lawsuit against the association premised upon an allegation that its board members made inappropriate and inaccurate accusations against him as part of a retaliation campaign.

pbella-300x255The lawsuit alleges that the community’s board of directors retaliated against Loff for an email that he sent to them complaining about security shortfalls and announcing his candidacy for a board seat.  Shortly after his email, the suit alleges that the board began accusing him of making unwanted advances to a female security guard, and it later put those accusations in writing via an email distributed to all the unit owners.

Continue reading

CSantisteban-200x300An article authored by the firm’s Christyne D. Santisteban is featured as the “Board of Contributors” expert guest commentary column in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s exclusive business daily and official court newspaper.  The article, which is titled “Tennis Court Argument Snowballs Into $7M Federal Discrimination Suit Against HOA,” discusses how associations must be prepared to address and resolve disputes among unit owners over shared amenities and other matters by using a set process that typically includes letters from the association’s attorney, impartial board/committee meetings and hearings, and possibly also reasonable fines and suspensions.  Otherwise, these skirmishes could snowball into potentially dangerous confrontations that may expose associations to severe legal and financial liabilities, as a recent federal lawsuit with shocking allegations of discriminatory conduct illustrates.  Her article reads:

. . . The recent suit involves allegations of horrid discriminatory conduct and statements against homeowners Jeffrey and Deborah LaGrasso at the Seven Bridges community in Delray Beach, Florida. It seeks $7 million in compensatory and punitive damages from the community’s HOA and Rachel Aboud Tannenholz, who allegedly engaged in harassing behavior that included phone calls, text messages, personal visits to the plaintiffs’ home, and discriminatory posts on Facebook. dbrlogo-300x57The suit alleges the HOA and Tannenholz violated the federal Fair Housing Act by inflicting discriminatory behavior based on the LaGrasso’s religion and intentionally causing them emotional distress.

Continue reading

Laura-Manning-Hudson-Gort-photo-200x300Our firm’s South Florida community association attorneys are often called upon by journalists for their insights into the issues impacting condo communities and HOAs.  When The New York Times “Wealth Matters” columnist Paul Sullivan decided he needed to turn to a highly experienced community association attorney for input for a major article on association living, he called on shareholder Laura Manning-Hudson in our West Palm Beach office.

Paul’s article, which is titled “When Condo Boards and Residents Clash, Legal Bills Mount” and appeared in the Your Money section on Saturday, March 30, 2019, focuses on some of the most common issues that can cause disruptions and financial strains for community associations.  It reads:

My mother-in-law recently regaled me with a tale of intrigue, money and power in her South Florida homeowners association.

Seeking to raise about $6 million to refurbish the 20-year-old community, the association’s board had voted to assess each homeowner $7,000. But a group of vocal residents fought back, setting up a power struggle.

This conflict is nothing new to anyone who has dealt with a condominium board or homeowners association, which has well-defined obligations to the residents. As the overseer, it hires workers to cut the lawn, take out the trash, clean lobbies and common areas and maintain pools, tennis courts, golf courses and other amenities. If the elevator breaks or the roof leaks, the board gets it fixed.

But if it wants to do something cosmetic — renovate the lobby, add pickle ball courts or install a fitness center — the board needs to put its idea to a vote of the residents.

timslgo-300x46The article continues:

Continue reading

Contact Information