Articles Tagged with HOA regulations

EvonneAndris-srhl-law-200x300Firm shareholder Evonne Andris authored an article that was featured as the “My View” guest commentary column in today’s edition of the Miami Herald’s Business Monday, the newspaper’s weekly business supplement.  The article focuses on the brouhaha that drew considerable media attention in Orlando earlier this year involving an HOA’s dispute with a homeowner family over a “Little Free Library” book-sharing box installed in the front yard of their home.  Evonne’s article reads:

The library in question is a red wood box that resembles a birdhouse and is mounted on a sturdy wood post. The box, which is 24 inches tall, 20 inches deep and 24 inches wide, is part of the “Little Free Library” (www.littlefreelibrary.org) nonprofit organization’s network of free book exchange boxes that encourage reading and enable people to share books with their community. While popular in the central part of the state, there are approximately 10 Little Free Libraries in the South Florida area and more than 60,000 Little Free Libraries across the country.

agarik-1024x576The news reports indicate that within a few days of homeowners Bob and Autumn Garick installing the library box in their front yard, the property manager for Bentley Woods wrote to thank them for their efforts and suggest that they move the box to a common area in the neighborhood. The Garicks declined the offer, noting that the suggested area was about a half-mile from their home and would make it impractical for them to maintain the library.  Pictured here are the Garicks with their Little Free Library (photo courtesy, Autumn Huff Garick).

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Community association attorneys are often asked about the lack of uniformity in the Florida laws and regulations for condominium associations and those for homeowners associations. There are many differences between the statutes governing condominium associations and those for HOAs, and condominiums are much more heavily regulated.

In fact, all condominium associations in the state must pay an annual fee to fund the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation’s Division of Condominiums, which serves to provide regulatory oversight over condominium association elections and disputes stemming from the actions of their members and boards of directors.

Homeowners associations have been excluded from the purview of this state agency since its inception, which, among other things, has created significant discrepancies in the laws governing these different types of community associations involving their elections, meetings, board recalls, vendor contracts, and other areas. However, a bill that was introduced by Rep. John Cortes of Osceola County seeks to change that and bring HOAs under the regulatory oversight of the state agency.

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HB 653 represents potentially sweeping changes for HOAs in Florida. It seeks to rename the state agency in order to add homeowners associations to its name; authorize the agency to investigate certain complaints involving HOAs, conduct related investigations and adopt penalty guidelines; have HOAs pay an annual fee to fund the agency, provide notices for certain meetings, impose certain fines, and revise annual meeting requirements; and it provides for changes to the provisions relating to the transition of association control, and the requirements for voting by general and limited proxy and for board elections and vacancies.

The bill calls for the state agency to oversee the mediation of HOA disputes and maintain a list of certified mediators who the associations must use for these proceedings. HOA elections, which have historically been left to the protocols and procedures established under their respective declarations, would be required to adhere to the process that has been in place for condominium associations.

The changes involving elections are very significant, as are the measures pertaining to meeting notice procedures. If the bill is passed and these new provisions go into effect on July 1, 2016, HOAs across the state will need to be prepared to make dramatic changes to many of their policies and procedures. This will undoubtedly present some serious difficulties and challenges for many associations that have grown accustomed to their previous protocols over the years and decades, but the introduction of this bill appears to send the message that the time for uniformity in the state’s laws governing condominium and homeowners associations may now be upon us.