Featured Articles

RobertoBlanch2013As leaders in the field, our firm’s community association attorneys are often contacted by journalists for their insights into timely issues involving condominium associations and HOAs.  The latest example of one of our partners serving as an industry source on association topics comes in an article featuring quotes and analysis from Roberto C. Blanch that appears on the front page of today’s Daily Business Review, South Florida’s only business daily and official court newspaper.

The article focuses on a complaint to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development against a Florida condo that is accused of religious discrimination for prohibiting prayers and religious meetings in its social rooms.  The association for the Cambridge House condominium in Port Charlotte is alleged to have violated the Fair Housing Act when its board voted to forbid religious meetings in the common rooms.

Dunbar_Piano_ImageThe complaint, which was filed earlier this week, is on behalf of resident Donna Dunbar against both the association as well as its management company.  It states that as a lay minister in the Seventh Day Adventist Church, Dunbar led a women’s Bible study group with about 10 women, including Cambridge House residents and guests, in a common room for two hours on Monday mornings, but the board of directors voted Feb. 6 to prohibit prayers, religious services and religious meetings in the common areas.  It then posted a sign on an organ in the lobby reading “ANY AND ALL CHRISTIAN MUSIC IS BANNED!”.

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A recent newspaper report about squatters in condominium units illustrates the level of vigilance that associations and their property management must employ to prevent any unauthorized uses of their residences.

The article in January by the Citrus County Chronicle documented the case that took place at The Islands condominiums in Crystal River, Fla. (pictured below).  Work on the residences in the community became necessary due to extensive damage caused by Hurricane Hermine in September 2016, and it had been progressing well until several unit owners discovered workers were staying in the units without permission.

ilndscndo-1024x668It began when one of the owners noticed wet floors near the shower and other indicators that the construction workers were not just replacing cabinets or working on the carpets.  He and a neighbor later found workers sleeping overnight in the condo unit of another owner who did not know they were there, so they called the police. Continue reading

Just as with the “sunshine” laws mandating public access to the decision-making processes within the state government of Florida, community associations have their own sunshine laws to ensure that unit owners are able to monitor and participate in their governance.  These laws, which include the owners’ right to attend and record board of directors’ meetings as well as to speak on agenda items at the meetings, are brought into play in the association context when a quorum of the board of directors meets to discuss association business.  As such, directors must always remain mindful of the fact that they should avoid discussing association business, or making decisions on behalf of an association, outside of properly noticed meetings. Continue reading

MichaelHymanThe firm’s Michael L. Hyman authored an article that appeared as a “Board of Contributors” guest column in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s exclusive business daily and official court newspaper.  The article, which is titled “Associations Must Strictly Comply With Notice Requirements to Impose Fines, Liens,”  focuses on a recent ruling by the state’s Fourth District Court of Appeal that illustrates how Florida’s courts are going to demand very strict adherence to the statutory notice requirements in order for associations to impose fines and liens against unit owners.  Michael’s article reads:

A ruling last year by the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal illustrates the severity of the consequences for community associations that do not follow the law to a tee in their notices to unit owners. In Dwork v. Executive Estates of Boynton Beach Homeowners Association, the appellate panel reversed the lower court’s award of fines because the HOA only provided 13 days’ notice of the fining committee hearing to the homeowner as opposed to the statutorily required 14 days.

dbr-logo-300x57The case arose over a dispute involving the stipulations in the HOA’s governing documents requiring all homeowners to keep their roofs and driveways clean and their fences in good condition. The association notified Jonathan Mitchell Dwork of violations of these requirements multiple times over several years, but he took no action.

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MichaelChapnicksrhl-law-200x300Firm partner Michael E. Chapnick authored an article that appeared as a “Board of Contributors” guest column in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s exclusive business daily and official court newspaper.  The article, which is titled “Emotional Support Animals Leave Many Condo Associations Howling,” focuses on the growth in requests for emotional support animals in condominium associations and other communities with pet restrictions.  Michael’s article reads:

The laws governing emotional support animals emanate from the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988, and its state and local counterparts. The act prohibits discrimination in the provision of housing to disabled persons, and it requires that a reasonable accommodation in an association’s rules and regulations be provided to a disabled person so that they can use and enjoy the property to the same extent as a nondisabled person.

dbrlogo-300x57Disabilities can take many forms: some physical and others emotional and/or psychological.  For emotional and/or psychological disabilities such as depression, there are rarely obvious, external symptoms.

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Community associations often have to wrestle with challenging issues and areas of concern that can be extremely difficult to remedy.  While directors are charged with developing appropriate rules and regulations to solve all of the difficulties that may arise, without the proper guidance from highly experienced and qualified management and legal professionals they can easily make the mistake of over-reaching with responses that wind up doing more harm than good.

Such appears to be the case with the California association that made national headlines recently for its reaction to its discovery that an owner was allowing tenants to reside in their converted garage.  To address the problem, the association for Auburn Greens in Placer County taped notices on all of the residents’ doors informing them that their garage doors must be kept open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, effective immediately, with violations resulting in $200 fines and an administrative hearing.

bad-garage-300x225As one would imagine, the outcry from residents was severe.  Residents had legitimate security concerns about the rule, which left them without any effective means for protecting their belongings in their garages during the day.

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Marc-Smiley-SRHL-law-200x300The firm’s Marc A. Smiley authored an article that appeared as a Board of Contributors guest column in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s exclusive business daily and official court newspaper.  The article, which is titled “Delay Causes Loss for HOA in Lawsuit Over House Color,” discusses the takeaways from a recent ruling by the Appellate Division of the 13th Judicial Circuit Court in Hillsborough County.  The ruling focuses on one of the most common architectural review stipulations that homeowners’ associations use to maintain aesthetic standards for their communities:  the approval of the colors which homeowners may use to paint the exterior of their homes.  Marc’s article reads:

Many HOAs require the prior review and approval of proposed house colors by architectural review committees, which are typically overseen by three parcel owners who are not also members of the association’s board of directors.

However, many associations’ governing documents also include provisions to limit the power of the association to take action against color changes and other architectural modifications in perpetuity. Their declarations of covenants hold that new colors and other unapproved modifications will be deemed to be approved if they are not challenged by the association within a set period of time (typically one year).

dbrlogo-300x57A recent ruling by the Appellate Division of the 13th Judicial Circuit Court in Hillsborough County confirmed that such requirements for community associations to act within a set timeframe will be strictly construed and applied by Florida’s courts.

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A recent Florida case involving a condominium association and the dog of a 70 year-old army veteran and widower drew national attention after it was covered initially in the Orlando Sentinel.  The newspaper’s reports chronicle how the association for the Orange Tree Village condominium is attempting to ban the dog because it weighs 41 pounds, which is six more than the maximum weight under its rules, and it may be a banned breed.

As a result of the association’s decision, retired veteran Robert Brady filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development after an arbitrator determined he had to surrender the dog by Jan. 11. dog4-300x171 The federal agency is now looking into whether the association can force the long-time resident to surrender his emotional support dog.

The attorney for Orange Tree Village said that his office has received calls sympathetic to Brady, but his client must enforce its rules that were established to keep residents safe.

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Our firm’s other community association attorneys and I are often called upon by association boards of directors and property managers with issues involving obstinate and disruptive unit owners who become a serious nuisance to directors, management and other residents.  In such cases, after warnings, incident reports and fines have failed to have any effect, legal action can serve as an effective recourse.

Such appears to be the case in the recent lawsuit filed by the condominium association for The Mark Yacht Club on Brickell Bay (pictured here) in Miami-Dade Circuit Court. the-mark-yacht-club-on-brickell-bay The association is suing Nuri Munis, Pelin Munis Cakov and Seda Munis, who own two units in the 36-story condo building, for putting the board of directors, property manager, staff and fellow residents through a hellish ordeal.

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Hoarding is becoming an increasingly common problem throughout the nation, especially for community associations where people are forced to cohabitate at close proximities. Depending on its gravity, hoarding can pose health threats to fellow residents, causing foul odors and pest control issues that spill over into hallways and neighboring units. Despite being a nuisance, it is important to remember that compulsive hoarding is a disorder, one which usually implicates some sort of mental health issue. As a result, community association board members and property managers should be sensitive and discrete when handling hoarding concerns in their communities.Hoarding-300x157 Continue reading