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Articles Posted in Community Amenities, Common Elements

The start of a new year represents a slew of new beginnings for most community associations. From holding annual elections to the preparation of annual budgets, the first quarter of the year marks a pivotal time for many associations. With that comes a great deal of confusion, particularly with regard to the proper way to fund reserves.

Constant new development of residential and mixed-use towers can be seen all over South Florida, with new projects being announced constantly. The construction of these new towers evokes buyers to ask themselves: What is better, new or old? The answer to that question is triggering existing community associations to spruce up their communities by giving them a facelift in an effort to stay competitive.

An arbitration decision rendered earlier this year by the State of Florida Division of Condominiums involving a dispute over alterations approved by a condominium board without a prior meeting and vote of the unit owners did not surprise our firm’s community association attorneys. We often find ourselves reminding association directors and property managers that the changes they are considering – albeit seemingly minor in nature – could be among those changes that are considered “material alterations” requiring approval by the membership.

With the spike in gasoline prices over the last five years, plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) are becoming increasingly popular, and auto industry analysts predict that Florida will be among the leading states in the country for PEVs. For those who reside in a single-family home, plugging in these vehicles for overnight charging presents little difficulty, however the challenges of charging them overnight can be significant for someone who lives in a condominium. Our firm has already had several condominium association clients inquire about their responsibilities and options for accommodating these cars, and their approaches toward finding a solution can vary a great deal.

Many of the condominiums and condo-hotels in South Florida offer valet parking for the convenience of their residents and guests. With so many gatherings and celebrations taking place at these properties, the valet companies that provide these services sometimes face the difficult situation of whether to provide an individual who is clearly intoxicated with their vehicle for them to drive. The question then arises: Are the valets legally liable for any incidents resulting from visibly intoxicated drivers to whom they have returned vehicles?

In addition to several of our other community association attorneys, I have recently counseled some of our clients about the applicability of the new pool accessibility requirements under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The new ADA pool accessibility requirements apply to state and local government services as well as places of public accommodations (e.g., hotels, fitness centers, etc.), and they call for the provision of accessible means of entry and exit from pools. The Department of Justice recently extended the compliance deadline for existing pools to January 31, 2013.