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Articles Tagged with community association suspension of use rights

Florida community associations are always seeking to implement the most cost-effective options at their disposal to collect unpaid dues and compel unit owners/residents to comply with their rules and restrictions.  CPool-300x227ondominium associations used to have very few practical remedies at their disposal to address delinquencies and violations.  They could file lawsuits or arbitration actions, but the costs of pursuing these cases can be a significant expense, and the imposition of fines requires the use of a fining committee and can be difficult to collect.

As a result of legislative changes to the state’s Condominium Act a number of years ago, associations are now able to suspend the rights of an owner, tenant or guest to use common elements and facilities if the owner of the unit is delinquent more than 90 days in paying a monetary obligation to the association.  Condominium associations may also suspend, for a reasonable period of time, the right of an owner and/or resident to use common elements and amenities for the failure to comply with any provisions of the association’s declaration, bylaws or rules. Continue reading

In 2010, at the height of the recent foreclosure crisis, community associations in Florida gained an effective tool to aid them in their efforts to collect upon delinquent assessments.  It was at that time that the legislature amended Florida law to authorize community associations to suspend the rights of unit owners and their tenants to use portions of the community’s common elements and amenities if the owner became delinquent by more than 90 days in their obligation to pay association monetary obligations, including assessments.  Currently, the law also extends the association’s right to suspend such use rights in the event that the owner or their tenants should fail to comply with the association’s governing documents or rules.

Prior to then, associations had few practical remedies at their disposal to address violations of rules.  For instance, associations had the options of filing costly and lengthy lawsuits or arbitration actions, or imposing nominal fines.  As for collection of delinquent assessments, associations’ options were limited to placing liens on the homes or units owned by delinquent owners – a remedy with limited effectiveness during the foreclosure crisis due to the statutory safe harbor protections benefiting lenders in Florida.

tenrightHowever, since its implementation, some associations have found that suspending owner and tenants’ rights to use common elements or facilities may be an effective measure for contending with delinquencies as well as violations of rules and other restrictions.

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